August 10, 2022

Futureality

Future Depends on What You Do

How marine conservation benefits from combining Indigenous know-how and Western science

  • On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we just take a glance at two stories that present the effectiveness of combining regular Indigenous ecological know-how and Western science for conservation and restoration initiatives.
  • Our first guest today is Dr. Gary Paul Nabhan, an ethnobotanist at the University of Arizona. He tells us about eelgrass, an ancestral food of the Comcaac individuals in the point out of Sonora in Mexico. Nabhan tells us why eelgrass is producing a significant comeback as a sustainable resource of meals for the Comcaac group and getting worldwide interest in the system.
  • We also communicate with Dr. Sara Iverson, a professor of biology at Canada’s Dalhousie College, about a exploration venture known as Apoqnmatulti’k that aims to greater recognize the actions of lobster, eel, and tomcod in two essential ecosystems on Canada’s Atlantic coastline. Iverson tells us why those people research species were being chosen by the Mi’kmaq folks and why it is so essential that the job combines diverse approaches of understanding, together with Western science and common Indigenous expertise.

Today we’re using a glimpse at two stories that display the efficiency of combining conventional Indigenous ecological information and Western science for conservation and restoration initiatives.

Pay attention here:

Previously this thirty day period, we showcased Indigenous aquaculture assignments on this podcast, seeking at mussel farms in New Zealand and clam gardens in British Columbia, Canada. Right now we’re sticking with aquatic environments and using a glance at two a lot more assignments, a single concentrated on seagrasses in Mexico and the other on fish together the Atlantic coast of Canada.

Our initially guest is Dr. Gary Paul Nabhan, an ethnobotanist at the College of Arizona. He tells us about eelgrass, an ancestral meals of the Comcaac individuals in the point out of Sonora in Mexico. Nabhan tells us why eelgrass is making a huge comeback as a sustainable source of meals for the Comcaac local community and gaining intercontinental attention in the system.

We also talk nowadays with Dr. Sara Iverson, a professor of biology at Canada’s Dalhousie College, about a exploration challenge known as Apoqnmatulti’k that aims to much better fully grasp the actions of lobster, eel, and tomcod in two critical ecosystems on Canada’s Atlantic coastline. Iverson tells us why those people review species were being chosen by the Mi’kmaq people today and why it is so crucial that the project combines unique techniques of realizing, like Western science and classic Indigenous awareness, which a Mi’kmaq elder dubbed ‘two eyed looking at.’

Even further examining:

• “In Canada, Indigenous communities and experts collaborate on marine research” (15 February 2022)

Further listening:

• “Podcast: Indigenous, ingenious and sustainable aquaculture from the distant past to today” (2 June 2022)

A researcher snorkels above a seagrass meadow. Impression courtesy of Seawilding.

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Abide by Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001

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Archive, Conservation, Setting, Showcased, Fish, Food stuff, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Oceans, Podcast, Analysis, Restoration, Science, Seagrass, Common Expertise

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